Image description

 

Describe a picture in your brain use as much descriptive language possible:

When you do that, images in your brain start jumping around just like a dream and when you use your language to describe that stream of consciousness and it makes connection the two parts of your brain because we use one half your brain to create language and we use the other part of the brain to create pictures and when we start to use one half your brain to describe what’s going on in the other side of your brain it’s connecting neural connections between two hemispheres and that will increase your IQ.

 

 

 

 

 

What can you tell by next picture?

 

That is another great exercise. Apparently  as prac

 

 

Are you someone attention to details?

Attention to detail is the ability to achieve thoroughness and accuracy when accomplishing a task. As many employers seek this skill, it is not surprising to see many students list on their resume that they have ‘strong attention to detail’. However when asked how they can demonstrate this skill, many are unable to answer.

Attention to details demands more than we think and involves different areas of the brain. Let’s suppose you go from point A to point B and you have to do the opposite way on your way back. The brain has two hemispheres, each divided into four lobes. Each lobe is responsible for different functions.

The occipital lobe is entirely devoted to vision. So, when you going from point A to B, you visualize everything is around you and try to “memorize” things around you.

The temporal lobe for language and memory. So, you memorize after you see the green house you have to turn left and immediately there is a post office.

The frontal cortex is responsible for decision making and planning. On the way back you see the post office then you decided quickly if you have to turn right or left.

Attention to details is important in every single profession. It demands concentration, patience and observation.

I added some simple exercises to exercise your attention to details.

Can you spot the Panda in the image below?

There are 16 circles in that image. Find them.

Don’t believe us? If you want to see them, you need to concentrate your attention on the vertical lines. Now the circles are seen more distinctively.

 

 

Does it looks normal?

 

Try to look upside down

These are the exact same image, the only difference is the first one is upside-down. Why does our brain perceive the upside-down version as normal when it’s actually been grotesquely altered?

Scientists are still puzzling this out, but there are a few possible explanations.

One possibility is that our brains rely a lot on expectations, so if we expect the faces to be normal, we will perceive them that way. A related explanation is that we have existing “mental maps” in our brains for common things like faces. Since our “mental maps” always have the facial features oriented one way, it’s hard for the brain to override the expected map of the face despite the facial features being flipped around.

 

Puzzles

The squares (d: easy)

 

Put the numbers 1 to 8 in the squares in a way the number before or after is not adjacent.

 

 

Painting a house (d: easy)

Joe can paint a house in 3 hours and Sam can paint the same house in 5 hours? How long does it take for them to paint one house if they do it together?

 

Solution

Image this scenario

Joe 1 house in 3 hours

Sam 1 house in 5 hours

Imagine Sam is faster and it takes 3 hours for him to paint one house. We would have:

Joe 1 house in 3 hours

Sam 1 house in 3 hours

Together they would paint 2 houses in 3 hours. So they would spend 1.5 house to paint one house.

Imagine now Joe is slower and it takes 5 hours for him to paint one house. We would have:

Joe 1 house in 5 hours

Sam 1 house in 5 hours

Together they would paint 2 houses in 5 hours. So they would spend 2.5 house to paint one house.

The answer would be something between 1.5 and 2.5 hours, right?

Following that idea we could have

Joe 5 houses in 15 hours

Sam 3 houses in 15 hours

Together they painted 8 houses in 15 hours. So they would spend 15/8 hours or 1.9 hours to paint 1 house.

 

The Boxes (d: easy)

There are three boxes. One is labelled “APPLES” another is labelled “ORANGES”. The last one is labelled “APPLES AND ORANGES”. You know all boxes are labelled incorrectly. You may ask me to pick one fruit from one box without looking which box you pick the fruit. Which one would you choose?

How can you label the boxes correctly?

Solution:

Pick from the one labelled “Apples & Oranges”. This box must contain either only apples or only oranges.

E.g. if you find an Orange, label the box Orange, then change the Oranges box to Apples, and the Apples box to “Apples & Oranges.”

 

Surveying The Mad King’s Kingdom (d: medium)

You and a fellow traveller are caught trespassing through the kingdom of the fear-instilling Mad King. As a punishment, the king imprisons you both in separate cells and presents you with a riddle, which you must solve correctly in order to save your lives.

“From your separate cells, you can each see half the land of my kingdom,” says the king, “across which are distributed either 10 or 13 villages. Each day at 5 p.m., I will give each of you an opportunity to tell me the number of villages in my kingdom. If your answer is correct, you will both be freed. But if your answer is wrong, you will both be killed.”

On the fifth day, the two of you are freed. How many villages are there in the king’s kingdom, and how many villages did you each see? How do you know?

Useful Information:

  • The villages may be spread unequally across the kingdom.
  • You cannot see the villages that your fellow traveller sees and vice versa.
  • There is, of course, no communication between you and your fellow traveller, though you each know each other to be wise individuals.
  • A wise individual is one who understands logic.
  • You are not required to answer

 

Solution

Day 1: if one prisoner sees 11, 12, or 13 villages, then they can be certain there are 13 villages and will say so at 5 PM on this day.

Day 2: if one prisoner sees 0, 1, or 2 villages, they can be certain that *if* there were 13 villages, then the other prisoner would have seen 11, 12, or 13 villages, and would have called out the answer on Day 1. Since they didn’t, they can be certain there are 10 villages and will say so at 5 PM on this day.

Day 3: if one prisoner sees 8, 9, or 10 villages, they can be certain that *if* there were 10 villages, the other prisoner would have seen 0, 1, or 2 villages, and would have called out the answer on Day 2. Since they didn’t, they can be certain there are 13 villages and will say so at 5 PM on this day.

Day 4: if one prisoner sees 3, 4, or 5 villages, they can be certain that *if* there were 13 villages, the other prisoner would have seen 8, 9, or 10 villages, and would have called out the answer on Day 3. Since they didn’t, they can be certain there are 10 villages and will say so at 5 PM on this day.

Day 5: if one prisoner sees 6 or 7 villages, they can be certain that *if* there were 10 villages, the other prisoner would have seen 3 or 4 villages, and would have called out the answer on Day 4. Since they didn’t, the other prisoner must also be seeing 6 or 7 villages, and both prisoners are certain there are 13 villages and will say so at 5 PM on this day.

 

Weighing balls (d: difficult)

Image result for weight balls and scale puzzle heavier

You have 12 balls that all weigh the same except one, which is either slightly lighter or slightly heavier. The only tool you have is a balance scale that can only tell you which side is heavier. Using only three weightings, how can you deduce, without a shadow of a doubt, which is the odd one out, and if it is heavier or lighter than the others?

 

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